Posts Tagged "winston-salem"

October 6, 2010

secca

I really like the new animated SECCA (Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art)  logo designed by Pentagram’s Luke Hayman. To see the logo in action, check out Secca’s website. For all my fellow design nerds out there, AIGA Raleigh is hosting a talk with the designer next Thursday at Secca, which is located in Winston Salem. Awesome!

1 comments

April 13, 2010

SECCA

Another North Carolina art museum, another Pentagram logo, this time for the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem. In SECCA’s new logo, introduced last Thursday, the letters will change position with virtually every new application. SECCA has no permanent collection, and the dynamic, evolving logo reinforces the ideals set forth in the museum’s mission statement, namely to explore “the dynamic relationship between art and society” and to present “new trends and issues in contemporary art.”

I’m just guessing, but I doubt the SECCA logo will stir up nearly as much controversy as the new North Carolina Museum of Art logo.

4 comments

April 8, 2009

OK Q&A: Black Horse

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Last week we were lucky enough to have the extremely talented people behind Black Horse Studio drop by our office for a visit. Studio heads Jennifer Bostic & Lee Runion sat down with us to share their experiences at Black Horse and to show off their outstanding new photo books.

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Black Horse is a photography/cinematography studio based in historic downtown Winston-Salem with a client list longer than the Mississippi. They have a 13,000 sq. foot space in a gothic revival castle with gorgeous hardwood floors. Jealous much??

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Both Jennifer & Lee have been in the industry for a long time, so it was a pleasure talking with them about the state of commercial photography today. I always wondered if commercial photographers were frustrated by the seemingly unebbing transition to all digital work. As a casual travel photographer, I’ve found myself missing both the saturation of film and the methodology of the dark room. Black Horse has fully embraced the digital world, and Lee says it’s helped him ‘bring you, the client, a much better end product.’

blackhorse2.jpg

One of the great upsides of the digital transition is the abillity to leave a photoshoot with at least some idea of how the images turned out. It’s standard practice for Black Horse to have multiple computer monitors showing each shot as the photographer snaps away. This way their clients can stand by and see every detail of how the photoshoot is unfolding. I know that if all of my clients stood behind me and watched me work all day I’d probably hang myself with my mouse cord.

blackhorse3.jpg

Black Horse has a diverse staff of four alowing them to work all ends of the spectrum from gourment food stills to fashion photography. This variety helps to keep the staff refreshed and allows them to bring different styles to each project. We have a very similar experience at Flywheel in that our clientele ranges from art museums to university bioethics departments. It’s really nice to have an entirely new subject with it’s own unique challenges for each project.

blackhorse.jpg

Another huge advantage to having a client list as diverse as Black Horse’s is the ability to weather tougher economic times. We’ve seen so many excellent firms shut their doors because they subsisted on maybe 3 contracts and they were in industries like real estate development. It’s good to see another creative company flourish even in a recession.

blackhorse4.jpg

It was really nice getting to know the good people at Black Horse and we at OK Great wish them all the best!!

blackhorse5.jpg

5 comments

April 8, 2009

OK Q&A: Black Horse

blackhorsecard.jpg

Last week we were lucky enough to have the extremely talented people behind Black Horse Studio drop by our office for a visit. Studio heads Jennifer Bostic & Lee Runion sat down with us to share their experiences at Black Horse and to show off their outstanding new photo books.

blackhorse7.jpg

Black Horse is a photography/cinematography studio based in historic downtown Winston-Salem with a client list longer than the Mississippi. They have a 13,000 sq. foot space in a gothic revival castle with gorgeous hardwood floors. Jealous much??

blackhorse6.jpg

Both Jennifer & Lee have been in the industry for a long time, so it was a pleasure talking with them about the state of commercial photography today. I always wondered if commercial photographers were frustrated by the seemingly unebbing transition to all digital work. As a casual travel photographer, I’ve found myself missing both the saturation of film and the methodology of the dark room. Black Horse has fully embraced the digital world, and Lee says it’s helped him ‘bring you, the client, a much better end product.’

blackhorse2.jpg

One of the great upsides of the digital transition is the abillity to leave a photoshoot with at least some idea of how the images turned out. It’s standard practice for Black Horse to have multiple computer monitors showing each shot as the photographer snaps away. This way their clients can stand by and see every detail of how the photoshoot is unfolding. I know that if all of my clients stood behind me and watched me work all day I’d probably hang myself with my mouse cord.

blackhorse3.jpg

Black Horse has a diverse staff of four alowing them to work all ends of the spectrum from gourment food stills to fashion photography. This variety helps to keep the staff refreshed and allows them to bring different styles to each project. We have a very similar experience at Flywheel in that our clientele ranges from art museums to university bioethics departments. It’s really nice to have an entirely new subject with it’s own unique challenges for each project.

blackhorse.jpg

Another huge advantage to having a client list as diverse as Black Horse’s is the ability to weather tougher economic times. We’ve seen so many excellent firms shut their doors because they subsisted on maybe 3 contracts and they were in industries like real estate development. It’s good to see another creative company flourish even in a recession.

blackhorse4.jpg

It was really nice getting to know the good people at Black Horse and we at OK Great wish them all the best!!

blackhorse5.jpg

5 comments

April 1, 2009

Charlie Brouwer

charlie.jpg

I grew up in Winston Salem and at the time I totally took the city for granted. It was partly because I was too young to take advantage of the really fun things in the city & it was also probably a rebellious attitude of ‘if mom & dad like living here so much, this place must be the dumps.”

I’m older and *wiser* now, and I can finally see that Winston really is a solid place to live. One of the best things it has to offer is the South Easter Center for Contemporary Arts next to the R.J. Reynolds mansion. The last time I visited SECCA they had David Byrne’s tree drawing installtion on exhibit, which was quite a treat.

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I was saddened to see recently, however, that SECCA is closed for the entire year of 2009 for renovations! Fortunately the good people at the musem planned ahead for this situation & have invited seven renowned artists to set up installations throughout the city. The series is appropriately called ‘Artists in the Community,” and the first installtion is from Charlie Brouwer. This piece was entitled ‘Rise up Winston-Salem’ and was constructed in the historic Old Salem.

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Charlie was born in Holland, Michigan and has spent most of his life in the north. Since then he’s taken to the south and is currently nestled in the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virigina. His outdoor installation work certainly seems to incorporate southern spirituality; so much so, in fact, that I was rather surprised he didn’t grow up around here.

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2 comments