Posts Tagged "Interviews"

December 18, 2012

Revel In Portland, VOL 1

Hi friends. This whole year has been busy. My friend and business partner Janice have finally published our labor of love… Revel In Portland, VOL 1. We join Revel In New York guidebooks 1, 2 and 3. The Revel In brand was founded in NY by managing editors, Marc Santo and Scott Newman.

For curious travelers and locals alike. Revel In Portland is an arts and culture travel guide and platform, delivering a personalized view of the city, through the eyes of its most intriguing characters.  Volume 1 features conversational interviews with (illustrator) Carson Ellis, (chef) John Gorham, (filmmaker) Lance Bangs, (musicians) Chromatics, (designer) Tinker Hatfield, (photographer) Ray Gordon, (Bridge + Burn designer) Erik Prowell, (artist) Alicia McDaid, (architect) Jeff Kovel and (chickfactor editor) Gail O’Hara—alongside amazing contributors, beautiful pictorials and 72 personal recommendations on Portland’s ‘best of’ everything.  A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Portland’s Right Brain Initiative  -  enhancing our children’s education through the arts.

Stocking stuffers anyone?

Thanks for checking it out. XOCH

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August 29, 2011

CEST QUOI INTERVIEWS.

Instagram doesn’t need any introduction. What I like even more than this wildly popular app though is when awesome people make something out of it, or use it to create new stories. Like Callie Peck, NYC based all-around talent—on Instagram as Cest Quoi—interviewing people with amazing diptych portraits to go with the words (click on comments).

Her feed is pretty amazing—follow her, friends!

Love, CH

Read the rest of this entry »

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May 27, 2009

OK Q&A: Armando Bellmas

A short while ago we had the pleasure of interviewing our good friend Armando Bellmas while enjoying some frozen treats. Armando is a commercial photographer based in Charlotte, NC who thrives on working with & photographing people. He’s a hell of a guy and he’s always welcome in our studio.

(I recommend using headphones while watching the video… it was too windy for our super expensive, high-end camera equipment)

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April 16, 2009

OK Q&A: Jason Munn & The Small Stakes (…& a Giveaway)

Hi, everybody!  Today I’m happy to be bringing you our interview with Jason Munn from The Small Stakes.If you’re not already familiar with Jason, here’s the skinny: Based in SF, Jason is a graphic artist that works primarily in the show poster format (though he’s also  created some amazing work for museums, film, and magazines including Wired and Fortune).  His work is simple and bold and maintains a lot of the fundamental elements of traditional poster art while staying totally fresh and current.  Seriously, the dude is great at what he does.  A bunch of us here in the studio have his posters hanging up in our respective houses.danieljohnston.jpgJason’s churned out posters for some very enviable clients: Built to Spill, The Flaming Lips, The Constantines, Spoon (“The Small Stakes” is a Spoon song, der), Beck, Explosions in the Sky, the list goes on and on.  Open any reputable music magazine to a random page, put your finger down and Mr. Munn has probably designed a poster for whatever band you’re landing on.eits.jpgnoage.jpgJason was kind enough to take time out of one of his epic 12 hour days at his home studio (see: below) to answer some of our questions, share some favorite designs and give our readers a little insight into what’s behind The Small Stakes moniker…Obviously, you wouldn’t be doing what you do without music.  Can you talk a little about the impact music has had on your life?  Why did you decide to become a show poster artist as opposed to another kind of artist?Music really became a huge part of my life in junior high – around this time I started skateboarding and got into punk and independent bands soon after. It was skateboard graphics, magazines, and album covers that got me really interested in art and design. I had done a few posters, t-shirt designs, and album packages for some local bands when I was in college in Wisconsin. After I moved to Oakland near the end of 2002 some friends of mine began booking some shows in Berkeley and they asked me to create a poster for each of the shows, this is essentially how I got started making posters on a regular basis.beck.jpgFive bands that you’ve got in heavy rotation lately?Deerhunter, No Age, TV On The Radio, The Walkmen, Why?Are there any bands that you haven’t but would love to create posters for?I feel pretty fortunate that I’ve been able to work with and create posters for some of my favorite bands, but a couple bands that I would really like to create a poster for are TV On The Radio and My Bloody Valentine.andrewbird.jpgAre there any non-music clients you’re dying to work with?I’d love to do some more film posters. I did have a chance to make a poster for Christmas On Mars, the film created by The Flaming Lips, that was exciting to do.I’ve noticed a lot of similarities between your posters and the cut-and-paste design of 60’s era magazine work.  Do you draw any direct inspiration from that generation of design?Yes, I do, I’ve always enjoyed the limited use of color and the way ideas are conveyed in the work of that era.Could you tell us what your average day is like?An average day typically starts around 9am. I do most of my emailing and sometimes revisions to current projects in the mornings. I typically start new projects in the afternoon and depending on the day I’ll work until about 9 or 10pm.munnstudio.jpgWhat are the inspirational tools that you couldn’t survive without?  Websites, books, magazines, any frequent places you turn to for reference?  I don’t have a specific go to besides the project itself, most of the time this is plenty as again, I feel really fortunate that most of the projects I have the chance to work on I’m pretty excited about. The visual side of music is of course one of my biggest influences, I’m always picking up design books related to the visual aspect of music.A lot of people say that English teachers are failed writers.  Are show poster artists failed musicians?For a time I did want to be in a band, I was playing guitar for a bit, but half of the time when I thought about being in a band I was thinking about how our albums would look.deerhunter.jpgTo see more of Jason’s work, please visit his excellent website and consider picking up one of his posters.  They’re cheap, they’re numbered, they look great in a frame, they’re signed, they’re beautiful.  You’d be a fool not to!Also, if you’re diggin’ what you’re seein’ (and you’ve gotta be, right?), here’s your chance to snag a Small Stakes poster for free!  We’ll be giving away Jason’s newest poster for The Tallest Man on Earth (see below).  All you’ve got to do is comment on this post and let us know what you think and you’ll be entered into a random drawing to win the poster!  We’ll contact the winner on Tuesday (4/21), so be sure to leave your email address!  (Limited to US residents)tallestman.jpgThanks, Jason!

42 comments

April 16, 2009

OK Q&A: Jason Munn & The Small Stakes (…& a Giveaway)

Hi, everybody!  Today I’m happy to be bringing you our interview with Jason Munn from The Small Stakes.If you’re not already familiar with Jason, here’s the skinny: Based in SF, Jason is a graphic artist that works primarily in the show poster format (though he’s also  created some amazing work for museums, film, and magazines including Wired and Fortune).  His work is simple and bold and maintains a lot of the fundamental elements of traditional poster art while staying totally fresh and current.  Seriously, the dude is great at what he does.  A bunch of us here in the studio have his posters hanging up in our respective houses.danieljohnston.jpgJason’s churned out posters for some very enviable clients: Built to Spill, The Flaming Lips, The Constantines, Spoon (“The Small Stakes” is a Spoon song, der), Beck, Explosions in the Sky, the list goes on and on.  Open any reputable music magazine to a random page, put your finger down and Mr. Munn has probably designed a poster for whatever band you’re landing on.eits.jpgnoage.jpgJason was kind enough to take time out of one of his epic 12 hour days at his home studio (see: below) to answer some of our questions, share some favorite designs and give our readers a little insight into what’s behind The Small Stakes moniker…Obviously, you wouldn’t be doing what you do without music.  Can you talk a little about the impact music has had on your life?  Why did you decide to become a show poster artist as opposed to another kind of artist?Music really became a huge part of my life in junior high – around this time I started skateboarding and got into punk and independent bands soon after. It was skateboard graphics, magazines, and album covers that got me really interested in art and design. I had done a few posters, t-shirt designs, and album packages for some local bands when I was in college in Wisconsin. After I moved to Oakland near the end of 2002 some friends of mine began booking some shows in Berkeley and they asked me to create a poster for each of the shows, this is essentially how I got started making posters on a regular basis.beck.jpgFive bands that you’ve got in heavy rotation lately?Deerhunter, No Age, TV On The Radio, The Walkmen, Why?Are there any bands that you haven’t but would love to create posters for?I feel pretty fortunate that I’ve been able to work with and create posters for some of my favorite bands, but a couple bands that I would really like to create a poster for are TV On The Radio and My Bloody Valentine.andrewbird.jpgAre there any non-music clients you’re dying to work with?I’d love to do some more film posters. I did have a chance to make a poster for Christmas On Mars, the film created by The Flaming Lips, that was exciting to do.I’ve noticed a lot of similarities between your posters and the cut-and-paste design of 60’s era magazine work.  Do you draw any direct inspiration from that generation of design?Yes, I do, I’ve always enjoyed the limited use of color and the way ideas are conveyed in the work of that era.Could you tell us what your average day is like?An average day typically starts around 9am. I do most of my emailing and sometimes revisions to current projects in the mornings. I typically start new projects in the afternoon and depending on the day I’ll work until about 9 or 10pm.munnstudio.jpgWhat are the inspirational tools that you couldn’t survive without?  Websites, books, magazines, any frequent places you turn to for reference?  I don’t have a specific go to besides the project itself, most of the time this is plenty as again, I feel really fortunate that most of the projects I have the chance to work on I’m pretty excited about. The visual side of music is of course one of my biggest influences, I’m always picking up design books related to the visual aspect of music.A lot of people say that English teachers are failed writers.  Are show poster artists failed musicians?For a time I did want to be in a band, I was playing guitar for a bit, but half of the time when I thought about being in a band I was thinking about how our albums would look.deerhunter.jpgTo see more of Jason’s work, please visit his excellent website and consider picking up one of his posters.  They’re cheap, they’re numbered, they look great in a frame, they’re signed, they’re beautiful.  You’d be a fool not to!Also, if you’re diggin’ what you’re seein’ (and you’ve gotta be, right?), here’s your chance to snag a Small Stakes poster for free!  We’ll be giving away Jason’s newest poster for The Tallest Man on Earth (see below).  All you’ve got to do is comment on this post and let us know what you think and you’ll be entered into a random drawing to win the poster!  We’ll contact the winner on Tuesday (4/21), so be sure to leave your email address!  (Limited to US residents)tallestman.jpgThanks, Jason!

42 comments